Scott Stoll logo world traveler. A bicycle wheel and the globe symbolizes Scott's journey around the world on a bicycle.

Author Archive: Elz Cuya

Picture of Elz Cuya

Elz Cuya

Journalist. A San Francisco native, Elz has been writing all her life. More about Elz.
Meet our featured explorer Dr. Jane Goodall’s. Her curiosity and love for animals blossomed at a very young age.
Meet our featured explorer Carl Sagan. A man who spent his life bringing science to the layperson
Meet our featured explorer Robert Scott, antarctic explorer. An officer of the British Royal Navy, Scott was chosen to lead the first polar expedition on the specially built ship, the Discovery.
Once again, photographer Lisa Kristine brings us the extraordinary peoples from far-off worlds. This time, Mali and Morocco.
Our nine-to-five jobs certainly take a toll on us. That's why you want to be certain you get the most out of your vacation. Eco-tourism promises exactly that.
Julia Butterfly Hill climbed 180 feet (18 stories) up a thousand-year-old redwood tree to protest the clear-cutting of this endangered ecosystem and didn't come down for two years.
Tattoo artist Aleks Figueroa spends many hours of the day permanently staining people's skin with art, but he admits he doesn't always know what he's doing. Now, he's on a mission to find out.
Over the past three years, third-time American Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky traveled across the nation asking governors, teachers, children, retirees, the homeless and Hollywood stars alike, what is their favorite poem and why. He got an enormous response.
In celebration of National Poetry Month, I sought a story on traveling poets — it wasn't difficult. It seems that the theme of journeying is a universal one. Enjoy this story on traveling poets, Joi Barrios and Abena Songbird.
Cheryl Friedman can’t hold the same job for more than three years. This isn’t because she’s irresponsible, or untalented, it’s because she can’t let three years go by without taking a long trip.
Imagine riding your bike 7,000 miles to Nepal, carrying a year's supply of gear and food. Next, think about carrying 143 pounds, unassisted, up to Everest Base Camp. Now picture yourself climbing the world's tallest mountain alone, completely self-contained, without the help of Sherpas and without bottled oxygen. Sound impossible? In May of 1996, a Swedish mountaineer named Göran Kropp accomplished just that. Then he packed his gear and biked back home.
Argentine Tango: An Emotion that turns into Dance.